Category: Television

Apple Big-Screen TV Is Coming, Says Andreessen, Suppliers

Apple reportedly is testing several designs for a big-screen television, and Silicon Valley VC luminary Marc Andreessen says we’ll see a TV from Cupertino by 2015.

“It’s one of those poorly kept Valley secrets,” Andreessen said Wednesday at the DealBook conference.

This adds to the flurry of speculation, rumor and innuendo surrounding the greatest product Apple still hasn’t announced. Andreessen conceded that he doesn’t have any direct inside knowledge of the project and admitted Apple is notoriously tight-lipped about its plans, but according to Business Insider he said, “rumors about an Apple TV are strong” and we’ll see something next year. Or in 2014. Or possibly 2015.

We’ve all been hearing about Apple’s Next Big Thing for more than a year, and Andreessen’s comments should be taken with a grain of salt. But Andreessen knows a thing or six about what’s happening in Silicon Valley, and his comments are bolstered by a Wall Street Journal report that cites two unnamed executives at Apple suppliers who said Apple has been testing designs for a hi-def big-screen TV.

Read the complete article at Wired.

Augmented reality promoted in electronics show through “Magic Remote”

The LG consumer electronics brand has launched a new AR device for Smart TV.

LG’s presence at the Gadget Show Live included a new augmented reality “magic remote” device that was being plugged through their “The Magic is In Your Hand” experience.

The new device allows gestures and voice commands to operate a consumer’s Smart TV.

The augmented reality experience featured a device that would allow consumers to use their voice commands and gestures to use their Smart TVs. It was also being demonstrated at a number of different shopping centers in order to boost awareness for holiday shoppers.

Read the complete article at QR Code Press.

Election Night’s Big Winner: Television

According to Twitter, there were 31 million tweets on Election Day, with the site hitting a peak of 327,452 tweets-per-minute the moment TV networks called the race for President Obama. That was a record pace for the micro-blogging network, and the company considers it a point of pride that Twitter never once went down during the surge. As Twitter design chief Doug Bowman noted, “RIP, Fail Whale.”

Yet if you wanted to keep close tabs on who was winning Tuesday night, Twitter failed you. The same goes for much of the rest of the Web. The best way to figure out what was going on was to go old-school: Turn on the news, sit back, and relax.

TV’s best election geeks—especially CNN’s John King and NBC’s Chuck Todd—were faster, more accurate, and more thoughtful than most sources you could find online. Throughout the night, they told you where Obama was doing well, where Mitt Romney was weak, what was going on with congressional races, and why specific returns in specific swing counties across the nation mattered. With King’s “Magic Wall”—the data-spewing touchscreen map that he operated with the facility of a tweaked-out gamer—and with its live, exclusive reports on the vote count from important polling places in battleground states, CNN became something like a televised version of polling maestro Nate Silver’s FiveThirtyEight blog. If you were watching TV without the aid of the Web, you would have known pretty early last night that Romney was in trouble, and you would have known exactly why.

Read the complete article at Slate.

A TV Browsing Experiment That Lifts From First-Person Shooters

Browsing the web on the television has never quite worked. But now, Valve, makers of the biggest PC gaming platform, Steam, have released an attempt with gaming at its core.

If you aren’t a big gamer, you may have never heard of Steam. But with 50 million users, it’s a gargantuan PC gaming platform. Steam is a sort of iTunes or Xbox Live for the PC. And its founding company, Valve, has just released a beta called Steam Big Picture. With it, Valve, like every other platform in existence, wants to invade your television.

Big Picture lets you play games on your TV through a nicely framed interface, but that’s something you can already do by connecting an HDMI cord from a laptop to your television. Their more impressive feat is that they’ve designed everything to work–including full-blown web browsing–not with an awkward keyboard and mouse on your couch, but with a gamepad, like an Xbox 360 controller, including typing and web browsing.

Read the complete article at Fast Company.

Tobii shows off new augmented reality TV

Tobii develops augmented reality TV controlled by a users eyes

Tobii, a Swedish technology firm, showed off what could be the next generation of televisions at the recent IFA trade show in Berlin, Germany. The trade show often showcases the latest technologies that are emerging in numerous industries, such as entertainment and media. Tobii has taken eye-tracking, augmented reality technology and incorporated it into a new kind of television, called Tobii Gaze TV. The TV can be controlled through a series of eye movements that are tracked by standalone sensors.

Sensors track eye movements to control TV

Users will be able to change channels, adjust volume levels, and make use of other basic functions using only their eyes. Eye movement is tracked by a sensor that can be placed anywhere around the television itself.

Read the complete article at QR Code Press.

TV is moving online, and blue states are leading the charge

People living in states that tend to sway towards blue (Democratic) on the elections map watch 26% more online video than those in red states, according to Ooyala’s latest global video index report.

Ooyala is a video analytics startup that measures anonymized viewing habits of about 200 million unique viewers. It’s latest quarterly report compared the total number of video plays and to each state’s population.

States with cities that feature densely packed populations tend to watch more videos via mobile devices, which makes sense considering that those areas have high-speed Internet coverage as well as people who’ve got more time to fidget with their phones and tablets while shuffling to the bus stops or subway stations. Ooyala’s report found this to be true internationally as well, with Japan netting the greatest number of people watching video via mobile devices. (The U.S. also lags behind the U.K., Singapore, China, and Canada when it comes to mobile video watching trends.)

Read the complete article at VentureBeat.

Comigo Set to Overhaul Smart TV Experience

Smart TV platform creator to shine spotlight on enabling operators and broadcasters to reach leadership position at IBC 2012

Yarkona, Israel and Amsterdam, the Netherlands – 5th September 2012: Comigo today announced it will use its presence at IBC 2012 to demonstrate how its advanced solution can facilitate operators, broadcasters and other media companies to achieve competitive advantage in a dynamic market and explore new revenue opportunities.

Breathing life into any TV, smartphone and tablet, Comigo’s smart TV platform offers ground-breaking personalization capabilities and interactive social features. It includes a hybrid Android-based smart Set-Top-Box (STB) accompanied with a customized dual-sided remote control from Philips Home Control, which has both IR and RF capabilities. Comigo also provides client applications for both iOS and Android-based smartphones and tablets, web interface for operators and broadcasters, and back-end servers to support the platform’s features and capabilities.

Read the complete article at Readwire.

Google’s Plan to Steal TV’s Election Audience

NBC, CBS, ABC: Watch out, Google has you in its sights. If the company has its way, viewers looking to follow the U.S. elections won’t tune in to network and cable news outlets – they’ll log on to YouTube.

To achieve this, the company launched the YouTube Election Hub, a multi-sourced video channel designed to aggregate coverage and commentary from across media outlets old and new. Alongside clips from the likes of ABC News, Al Jazeera, Wall Street Journal and BuzzFeed is a curated feed of videos from other sources. YouTube will also be streaming debates and other important election-related events live from this landing page.

Read the complete article at ReadWriteWeb.

Glasses-Free 3D Movies In The Works

Researchers in South Korea have discovered a new way for moviegoers to enjoy 3-D movies without the hassle of wearing the bulky glasses, according to reports.

In a research paper published on Aug. 20 in the Optical Society’s journal Optics Express, engineers at the Seoul National University have proposed using one projector on a modified screen to achieve a 3-D experience instead of the traditional two projectors.
Read more at http://www.christianpost.com/

 

Not a Remix–Nor a Sampling: Why Fareed Zakaria’s Plagiarism is Unacceptable

Image: Huffpost

By Eduardo Navas

Note: This entry was updated on August 19, 2012 with an extra commentary at the end of the main text.

As an educator in higher education and researcher specializing in remix culture and authorship, when I first learned about Zakaria’s admission to plagiarism, I was very disappointed in him, and thought that there was no way around it, that his admission of plagiarizing parts of Jill Lepore‘s work on gun control written for the New Yorker puts into question his intellectual integrity.

I thought that his apology was quick and to the point, but that somehow it was not enough. I thought that it was necessary for Zakaria to come forward and explain in as much detail as possible the reasoning for his behavior. And I thought that I wasn’t alone in hoping for this to happen–that if an actual explanation was delivered, it would all serve the constructive purpose of discussing the seriousness of plagiarism with students while providing a concrete example of a public intellectual who committed such an unacceptable act.

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