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Vodule will become more focused on the relation between art and music and technology. We will be shifting our emphasis from emerging technologies to artists and music artists who are exploring the possibilities of creativity and expression with emerging technology.  Our emphasis on the concepts of modularity and volume will remain pivotal in the content that will be featured. It will take a couple of months before we begin our more streamlined mission. More very soon.


Excited about the potential of 3D printing but not quite ready to invest in a printer for your home? Then you are just the market that Staples is looking to woo as it moves into the 3D printing space.

Read the complete article at Singularity Hub.

Raquel Kogan Turns User Interactions Into Human Landscapes

“o.lhar can only exist when visitors look at the display, and when they do, they don’t see anything, but the piece sees them. In real time they’re thrown into a projection.” That’s how Brazilian media artist Raquel Kogan explains o.lhar (pictured above), one of her latest works that was exhibited at The Creators Project: São Paulo earlier this year.

Read the complete article at The Creators Project.

Augmented reality application from Amazon boosts live scanning capabilities

The Flow AR app for Android devices provides the ability for multiple products and text to be scanned.
Amazon’s Flow augmented reality app functions by hovering the mobile device camera feature over a product, such as a Blu-ray or a book, so that the online retailer can retrieve that item’s information.

The A9 subsidiary of Amazon has said that the new Android version of flow has much greater capabilities.

For example, its augmented reality app version is based on a much faster system that is capable of scanning several items at one time. Furthermore, it can tell the difference between similar sounding items, and can provide multiple product comparisons in order to help users to find the best item at the lowest price.

Read the complete article at QR Code Press.

Tablets vs. E-Readers: Why There’s Room For Both

E-readers are screwed.

That’s the main takeaway from Wednesdays ominously worded report from IHS, anyway. The numbers are pretty dramatic: By the end of the year, sales of dedicated ebook reading devices will have dropped 36% from 2011. Come 2016, says IHS, total e-reader sale volume will be just two-thirds of what it was last year.

Yikes. Is this really the death of e-readers?

It makes perfect sense that e-reader sales are falling off a cliff. Tablets are eating their lunch. Not only has Apple sold 84 million iPads to date, but the companies who have dominated the e-reader market are themselves shipping tablets now.

Consumers are quite naturally drawn to these multi-function, multimedia-capable gadgets that can stream movies, browse the Web, take photos, play Letterpress and do just about anything else app developers can dream up. And yes, those same devices – whose prices keep falling – let you read books too.

My iPad Is Great, But I Really Want A Kindle

When Steve Jobs first unveiled the iPad, I thought it was absurd. Never would I need to supplement my laptop and iPhone with this giant iPod Touch, I declared.

Read the complete article at Read Write.

U.S. Refuses To Sign Treaty On Net Regulation; Fears Legally-Binding Rules In Future


The United States has said it will refuse to sign an updated communications treaty set to be ratified by the United Nations, because it veers too far into agreements to regulate the Internet.

For the last two weeks, delegates from more than 190 countries have been discussing the UN treaty at a conference for the International Telecommunications Union in Dubai. Countries such as Russia, China and Saudi Arabia have pushed for proposals that include allowing nations to regulate global Internet companies and online content that is perceived as being “spam.”

The treaty is not legally binding, and does not come into effect until January 2015, but Ambassador Terry Kramer, who headed the U.S. delegation Dubai, said it was important to make sure that countries did not eventually agree to a more binding set of global agreements that they could use to justify acts of censorship online.

Read the complete article at Forbes.

Kinect component maker to launch compact 3D sensor to fit in smartphones

PrimeSense, which developed the 3D sensing technology used in Microsoft’s Kinect, is set to unveil a compact 3D sensor that can fit into a variety of consumer electronic devices.

Apple’s control through patents over many elements of touch-based user interfaces discourages competitors from innovating in this area, Malik Saadi, principal analyst with Informa Telecoms & Media, said Wednesday. Many vendors are looking into alternatives, like touch-free gesture recognition that can be facilitated by 3D sensors, he said.

For example, Samsung is looking at gesture recognition and will probably be deploying it next year or soon after, Saadi said.

Voice and gesture recognition are key to the future of smartphones, Saadi said. The combination of touch with voice and gesture recognition will very likely lead to a superior user experience and innovative application development, he said.

Read the complete article at PC World.

Searching without searching: Expect Labs taps Nuance for bold predictive computing tech

We’re now getting the first taste of a world where our computing devices fetch us relevant information without our asking. Google Now is the most notable example; it’s Google’s Siri-esque competitor that can learn from your daily routine and parse information in your e-mail.

In that same vein there’s Expect Labs, a small startup that’s been working on an “Anticipatory Computing Engine” that can understand conversations in real time and deliver relevant information to you. Today the company announced that its technology is getting a big accuracy boost with the addition of Nuance’s voice recognition technology, which also powers Siri, Google Now, and most other voice-recognition implementations.

“I really think, in the next 10 to 20 years, that the huge changes that we’re going to be seeing in software are really around becoming more intelligent,” said Tim Tuttle, the chief executive officer of Expect Labs, in an interview with VentureBeat. “It’s inevitable, and the way we’re going to use computers then will be fundamentally different.”

Read the complete article at VentureBeat.

Video network Koozoo puts a friendlier, crowd-sourced spin on Big Brother

Big Brother isn’t just a dystopian nightmare or bad television show anymore — it’s a growing part of the Internet age where people are connected all the time.

Koozoo is a platform that crowd-sources live video from public places to create a continuously broadcasting network. Members of the community can post and watch user-generated video feeds from places such as cafes or world landmarks.

Read more at VentureBeat.


Apple Big-Screen TV Is Coming, Says Andreessen, Suppliers

Apple reportedly is testing several designs for a big-screen television, and Silicon Valley VC luminary Marc Andreessen says we’ll see a TV from Cupertino by 2015.

“It’s one of those poorly kept Valley secrets,” Andreessen said Wednesday at the DealBook conference.

This adds to the flurry of speculation, rumor and innuendo surrounding the greatest product Apple still hasn’t announced. Andreessen conceded that he doesn’t have any direct inside knowledge of the project and admitted Apple is notoriously tight-lipped about its plans, but according to Business Insider he said, “rumors about an Apple TV are strong” and we’ll see something next year. Or in 2014. Or possibly 2015.

We’ve all been hearing about Apple’s Next Big Thing for more than a year, and Andreessen’s comments should be taken with a grain of salt. But Andreessen knows a thing or six about what’s happening in Silicon Valley, and his comments are bolstered by a Wall Street Journal report that cites two unnamed executives at Apple suppliers who said Apple has been testing designs for a hi-def big-screen TV.

Read the complete article at Wired.